In a sign of courtesy and respect for Pt. Nehru, our society needs to make efforts to figure out happiness for all the children. It is important for a nation that aspires to touch great heights to assure great quality education as well to all children residing in the country. Only a ubiquitous understanding that education is a basic fundamental right can take us into a direction of universal education.

Just before this year’s United Nations Annual Summit, Greta Thunberg— a Swedish teenager— exhorted the world leaders to act towards reversing the horrific ramifications of climate change and leave enough prospects of life for future generations. Even a case for having to resort to such kind of appeal is painful. In Indian context the discussion certainly becomes more important than anywhere else in world, let’s see how so?  

 

When national capital of India, along with a large stretch of north India, witnesses a severe crisis of poor quality air, we shall celebrate Children’s Day on 14th November. Isn’t it ironical that those children whom we celebrate shall reach to their schools with masks on, for the current generation failed to leave enough clear air for them to breathe easily?

 

It is well known that the day marks birth anniversary of India’s first Prime Minister Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru, who always had a special corner for children in his heart. Perhaps this love for kids emanated out of Nehru’s belief that they represented a promise to his vision of new-born nation. In a sign of courtesy and respect for Pt. Nehru, our society needs to make efforts to figure out happiness for all the children. Without a doubt it won’t be easy for it will take a lot that needs to be done and undone.

 

Here, I try to list down a few points that take us close to what substantiates a meaningful life for children of our society:

·       Beginning from the first footprints of a child in this world, there has to be a general understanding around gender sensitivity in the ways children (of varying genders) are treated.

·       Moving forward it is important for a nation that aspires to touch great heights to assure great quality education as well to all children residing in the country. Free education for all was a dream for Indian constitutional forefathers including Jawaharlal Nehru. The dream was eventually realised in 2019 by passage of Right to Education act (RTE) by parliament, though to a partial extent. Only a ubiquitous understanding that education is a basic fundamental right can take us into a direction of universal education.

·       Over the years India did a fine job in controlling birth and mortality rates by intensifying its operations in health sector. Free and better health services can bring sustainable happiness in the lives, as well as on the faces, of children.

·       Our society faces the stigma of passing on all to next generation what it itself received from its parents, and unfortunately, a want of good examples takes parenting in our society to a below average level. Though there are no copy-book courses for parenting but there is much that can be changed in the ways kids are raised up in our society. It is to be noted here that it is a direct corollary of second point that concerns education. A good education has the potential to make up for parents who are more sensitive, caring and worth emulating.

   

It is a struggle that has to be faced with 100 per cent for it is about future— future that we long for, future that is happier and future that is inspiring.