In her maiden speech, Nirmala Sitharaman as Union Finance Minister emphasised on research in education and noted down key reforms for the field with enhanced budgetary allocation for setting up infrastructure for research in all varsities and institutions all across India.

Indian nation is not famous for generous spending on education despite all the possibilities that make us a perfect destination for a sharp focus on human resource development. The wider panorama for education sector in country is going through a constant change, but pace is quite slow, if not stagnant, as the numbers speak. Expenditure on education stands around 3 percent of GDP, which is quite low in comparison to global standards of 6 percent.

 

Two recent developments marked for a significant change for future of education in the country— new government at helm with a remarkable confidence and go forward plan after New Education Policy (NEP 2018) was unearthed on 31st May. People showed a great trust in functioning of incumbent government and its leadership, thus delivered a thunderous win to ruling party for their second stint in government. More the people adore you, more is the responsibility. In its previous stint, the efforts at drafting new education policy finally blossomed in its latest stint when it was made public just after the inception of new government.

 

When it came to education, union budget as presented by Nirmala Sitharaman— Union Finance Minister— had National Educational Policy as its central theme around which most of the policy decisions revolved. Of the total education budget of 94,853.64 crore— 56, 536.63 crore were allocated to schools while 38,317.01 crore were allocated to higher education. Long term policy outlay for next five years dominated most of the education budget speech.

 

In her maiden speech, Nirmala Sitharaman as Union Finance Minister emphasised on research in education and noted down key reforms for the field with enhanced budgetary allocation for setting up infrastructure for research in varsities and institutions all across India. The proposal for formulation of National Research Foundation is being appreciated across the wider spectrum. But it has to be a process rather than being just a policy decision.

 

Another point that underlined Indian government’s eagerness to invite foreign students to diversify educational net is ‘Study in India’ programme. The global mix up will help Indian students to have a better understanding of world as well as it can help in propagating rich Indian culture and tradition to every corner of world. A continued emphasis on skill India programme through certification schemes can bring in major output changes for industry. The industry-ready generation will help in better manufacturing as well as it lowers cost.

 

In last few years, reforms have been proposed multiple times but reality says otherwise for the ministry has failed at times to spend all the money allocated. Now when government, policy and a zeal to act all seem afresh, a well checked implementation is all we need.