A language survives because of its writers and readers, essentially the lovers. It has to be a two way effort, for good literature produces more readers and better readership enables better literature to be produced.

The love sagas, the characters surviving test of time, the moments that are for now and just now— all parts of a story, are often penned down by people blessed with imagination that travels well beyond through day & night, earth & sky, mind & heart and right & wrong. However, this all might sound complex, but in actual this is life and those few people live it the way it is supposed to be and then put it in black and white.

 

The question that comes up next is whether people happen to grab those strings of imagination? And answer to it cannot be only absolute yes or absolute no. Written texts or literature reaches to people through various mediums such as books, translations, audio-visuals such as films and presentations. But it is never sure, if all that those words inherit, reach audiences, the reasons being transference glitches i.e. through lingual translations or screenplay and other than that it generally happens because of capacity and manner in which an individual relate to it— a very wide and general phenomenon.        

 

In any case, words are immensely powerful but only till they retain their true essence in minds and hearts of people. As everyone understands, we are not a country of readers instead of quite eager watchers. Lacs of words fashioned and put together in bundles as they lay on bookshelves of libraries, especially non-English ones (majorly Hindi) struggle to find readers. However, it is also true that it is not for everyone to publish a book and take it to highly competitive market on its own. Then what do the people do— all kinds of people especially those in want of resources i.e. young and marginalised voices?

 

Again, the technology has been at the forefront of it, for it has turned out to be a convenient way for millennials to say whatever they want to say, in their own words, own languages, own accents, and to their very own large audiences. Recently developed tradition of open mics has helped those special Hindi and vernacular speakers who never felt confident enough to publish their own couplets, poetries and short stories and much more because of social, geographical and economic constraints.

 

This is for Hindi— the language that many consider as mother language and the language that binds together hundreds of Hindustani bolis and the language which is single most spoken language of India. A language survives because of its writers and readers, essentially the lovers. It has to be a two way effort, for good literature produces more readers and better readership enables better literature to be produced.  

 

Open mics have opened up the possibilities of drawing in more and more audiences of Hindi. It won’t be too much to say that beyond helping Hindi in finding new ways to stand its ground, open mics have revitalized and energised the language. And more than that having indulged young individuals in process that are very dear to any language for they only are best fortified to imagine, stand and act, Hindi owes a lot to this new fly to sky.